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Author Topic: DHEA - Dehydroepiandrosterone  (Read 5875 times)

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slowandsteady

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DHEA - Dehydroepiandrosterone
« on: October 25, 2009, 04:21:25 PM »

More information on DHEA. In the article Marked attenuation of production of collagen type I from cardiac fibroblasts by dehydroepiandrosterone:

Quote
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a type of adrenal steroid. The concentrations of DHEA and its sulfate (DHEA-S) in serum reach a peak between the ages of 25 and 30 yr and thereafter decline steadily. It was reported that DHEA-S concentration in humans is inversely related to death from cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we examined the effects of DHEA on regulation of collagen mRNA and collagen synthesis in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. Treatment with DHEA (10–6 M) resulted in a significant decrease in procollagen type I mRNA expression compared with controls. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in procollagen type I protein accumulation in the medium and also a significant decrease in procollagen type I protein synthesis in the cellular matrix. Furthermore, to confirm in vitro results, we administered DHEA to Sprague-Dawley rats, which were treated with angiotensin II for 8 wk to induce cardiac damage. Procollagen type I mRNA expression was significantly decreased and cardiac fibrosis significantly inhibited in DHEA-treated rat hearts without lowering the systolic blood pressure. These results strongly indicate that DHEA can directly attenuate collagen type I synthesis at the transcriptional level in vivo and in vitro in cardiac fibroblasts.

Anecdotally, I do seem to get relief from 300 mg of 7-keto-DHEA in the mornings, and it seems to be repeatable too. I might play around with the dose a bit and get DHEA-S levels retested.
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slowandsteady

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2009, 04:28:39 PM »

In a mouse model, "[a]dministration of exogenous DHEA ameliorates the severity of acute and chronic [antigen-induced arthritis], presumably by suppressing cell-mediated immunity against mBSA (the inducing antigen) and formation of autoantibodies. However, because of the fundamentally different DHEA physiology in rodents, the role of such a replacement therapy in human RA deserves further elucidation" (PMID 15105968). The protection against of antigen-induced arthritis is interesting in Peyronies Disease because of the autoimmune component it seem to have.
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George999

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2011, 06:42:56 PM »

S&S, how long did you pursue DHEA?  At this point, I am taking DHEA for general inflammation issues and have just upped my dose to 200mg/day.  It certainly seems to be helping me for my other inflammatory problems quite remarkably.  I really have not observed any obvious impact on Peyronie's at this point, but we will see what happens as I attempt to tweak my Free T levels into an optimal range.  I just got a full male hormone blood panel done and my DHEA-S is still abnormally low even after a month on 100mg/day.  One doctor actually expressed concern regarding my overall Adrenal function because of this and suggested that I go back on Rhodiola.  I am really not sure how 7-Keto differs from straight DHEA, I *know* all the theories, but am not really all that convinced, but would like to here your DHEA story in retrospect.  - George
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goodluck

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2012, 12:50:25 PM »

George,

Have you recently had your diurnal cortisol evaluated.   I have been told that cortisol and DHEA can be inverse to each other.  As one goes up the other goes down.  There is a balancing act.

As you know DHEA is a precursor to testosterone and also Estrone, Estriol, Estridiaol and DHT.

Hormones are complicated.

As a LEF reader you know how powerfull Rhodiala can be to balance adrenals and handle stress(it does not work on 10% of the population).  Also consder Ashwagandha, this is another adaptogenic herb.

I think when it comes to adrenals you need to think about the HPA Axis and balancing things out.  Why are the adrenals not working propperly? Not easy at the least.

Some food for thought at a minimum.

Good Luck
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George999

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2012, 03:07:59 PM »

At this point the 200mg of DHEA is doing wonders for me.  I had a nasty skin lesion that I could only control with cortisone cream daily and now I don't need cortisone anymore and the lesion is gone.  That shows the power of DHEA against auto-immune/inflammatory type issues.  My naturopath has an adrenal test waiting for me, I just haven't gotten around to doing it at this point.  Thanks for the encouragement in that direction and also regarding the Rhodiola.  I need to not forget about getting back on that either.  - George
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goodluck

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2012, 09:58:48 PM »

  A good source for info on Adrenals is adrenalsweb.org.  They follow much of the advice of Dr. Lowe  (who recently passed away) and other naturpaths.  Most allopaths will not agree with what they recomend.  However it is food for thought.  It will give you some good advice on how to prepare for the salia test. 

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slowandsteady

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2012, 11:53:40 PM »

I wonder if a sulfur deficiency can lead to a DHEA deficiency, and hence supplementing with DHEA gives improvements. While I'm taking type I and III collagen, I might throw some MSM into the mix.
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slowandsteady

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2012, 10:52:30 AM »

I've noticed in my case that it takes me longer than expected to recover from exercise. Towards the end of last year's running season I was quite run down -- achy tight muscles, slow healing of soft tissue ailments, inelastic tendons, and plantar fasciitis (the plantar fascia in both of my feet are thickened). Some of these issues might be explained by low hormones. In addition I often have cold extremities.

There are some concerns with long term dosing of hormones or hormone precursors. I'm just not sure about all of the issues involved. The initial regimen I am considering would be the LEF product containing 25 mg of DHEA and 100 mg of 7-keto DHEA (the form that doesn't convert to steroid hormones), as well as 50 to 100 mg of pregnenolone. My thought with pregnenolone is to suppy the precursor and let my body decide what to make with it.
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George999

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2012, 11:08:26 AM »

At this point I am moving away from oral DHEA and toward sublingual DHEA.  This is to avoid shoving all the DHEA through the liver and instead infusing it more naturally into the bloodstream as the adrenals would do.  When you push it all through the liver, the liver goes on red alert furiously converting it into DHEA-s, the inactive form.  This also puts an unnatural load on the liver like happens with statins or niacin and can cause liver inflammation over time.

I am also convinced that hormone issues are actually just a side effect of dysfunctional glucose metabolism, so I am focusing on that to the point that I am now using a serum glucose tester to monitor my serum glucose myself.  I have found that I have some fairly large spikes even though I am extremely careful about my diet.  Using the glucose monitor, I have already been able to successfully address that to some degree and my weight is magically dropping as a result.  As much as I hate having to poke my fingers, it is worth it when I see the results.  I think if I can ever get my serum glucose down in the 83-85mg range where my children's levels are I will no longer have need of all the other stuff, including the DHEA.  I was shocked to learn of the existence and growing incidence of IGT and of the fact that it can be as dangerous as diabetes and produce the same disease syndromes.  I am convinced that IGT is what has caused all my problems.
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goodluck

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2012, 11:10:50 PM »

What is IGT??

What do folks know about MSM relative to Peyronies?
Are there any studies that looked at it.?
I know it is recommended for soft tissue support and those with arthritis.

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George999

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2012, 10:45:03 AM »

IGT is "Impaired Glucose Tolerance".  The test for it is to test serum glucose level two hours after an oral dose of 75mg of glucose.  A reading of over 140mg/dL indicates IGT.  IGT can result in the same tissue damage as Diabetes.  IGT is NOT the same thing as IFG or "Impaired Fasting Glycaemia" measured by doing a blood test for glucose after an 8-12 hour fast.  IGT is considerably more dangerous than IFG.  Many people have normal A1C levels AND do NOT have IFG, but DO have IGT, but almost no doctors test for IGT.  I, myself, had peripheral small fiber neuropathy and even the neurologists did NOT test me for IGT.  Instead I was given an MRI which told them nothing and a number of standard nerve conductivity tests which also told them nothing.  So my disease was simply labeled idiopathic and I was told nothing could be done for it.  I was NEVER tested for IGT.  I should have been.

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/diet-fitness/diabetes/articles/2012/01/25/many-docs-use-costly-mris-to-diagnose-nerve-condition-study

IGT is insidious.  It is likely causing a lot of health problems around the world and it is not be tested for at all.  - George

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impaired_glucose_tolerance
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impaired_fasting_glycaemia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes_mellitus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycated_hemoglobin
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goodluck

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Re: DHEA
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2012, 12:13:25 PM »

George,

Thanks,  it sure seems the word needs to get out on this.
I am sure there will be backlash from the diagnositc centers that make big money on MRI's.

The nerve conductivity studies are very uncomfortable and I am sure everyone would not mind avoiding them if at all practicle.

Best,

Good Luck
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