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Author Topic: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy  (Read 14207 times)

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newguy

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« on: September 30, 2009, 01:36:54 AM »

It came up in a couple of places, so I figured it may as well have its own thread. I'll get us started:

Hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of early-phase Dupuytren's contracture

Quote
Dupuytren's disease (DD) is a proliferative disorder of autosomal-dominant inheritance, with variable penetrance of gene expression. The treatment of DD is challenging. Both operative and nonoperative approaches were reported for treatment of the disease, but no perfect approach has gained popularity as the best choice of treatment. Most of the emphasis has been placed on surgical techniques, but outcomes were reported to be dependent on some variables such as case selection, timing of surgery, and the surgeon's training and experience. In this paper, we report on a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment for early-phase DD. HBO treatment was applied to a female aged 23 years who had a mild form of DD. Physical findings and complaints before and after HBO treatment were compared. Total relief of symptoms as well as physical findings were obtained with HBO treatment. HBO for the treatment of DD is a novel concept. Having treated only one case is not enough to conclude that HBO is the only effective mode of treatment for DD. HBO should also be tried to treat early-phase or mild contractures of DD. Unfortunately, HBO has a disadvantage, i.e., cost. But HBO is not invasive, and because of the nature of HBO treatment, most of the complications seen after surgeries, e.g., wound-healing problems, damage to the digital nerves and vessels, buttonholing of the skin, and tendon sheath opening, are not seen


The effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on erectile function recovery in a rat cavernous nerve injury model.

Quote
INTRODUCTION: Cavernosal oxygenation appears to be important for preservation of erectile tissue health. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been shown to improve tissue oxygenation and has neuromodulatory effects. AIM: This study was designed to define the effects of HBOT on erectile function (EF) and cavernosal tissue in the rat cavernous nerve (CN) injury model. METHODS: Four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: rats with bilateral CN crush, HBOT treated (Crush+/HBOT+); bilateral CN-crush/no HBOT (C+/H-); no crush/no HBOT (C-/H-); and no crush/HBOT (C-/H+). HBOT was delivered daily for 90 minutes at three atmospheres for 10 days commencing the day of CN crush. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ten days after CN injury, the animals underwent CN stimulation measuring the maximal intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure (ICP/MAP) ratios. Corporal tissue was harvested pre-sacrifice, and immunohistochemically stained for nerve growth factor (NGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cluster of differentiation molecule (CD31). Histologic analysis was performed for Masson's trichrome to assess the smooth muscle-collagen ratio. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling assay was used to define apoptotic indices (AIs). RESULTS: The C+/H- group had significantly lower ICP/MAP ratios compared with C-/H- rats, (31% vs. 70%, P < 0.001). C+/H+ rats had significantly higher ICP/MAP ratio recovery compared with the C+/H- group (55% vs. 31%, P = 0.005). NGF and eNOS staining densities were higher in C+/H+ rats compared with C+/H- rats (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). No difference was seen in CD31 expression. Staining density for MT displayed a trend toward higher smooth muscle preservation after HBOT. AIs were significantly increased by HBOT (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HBOT following a CN injury improved EF preservation in this model, supporting the cavernosal oxygenation concept as protective mechanism for EF. The effects appear to be mediated via preservation of neurotrophic and endothelial factor expression.
- pubmed: 18194179

Interesting post regarding it from TheSolution here: peyroniesforum.net/index.php/topic,45.msg22304.html#msg22304  (cut n paste link as I can't post links right now. Either that it the post can be moved here)

Should this treatment be of use for peyronie's, which I don't consider to be entirely beyond the realms of possibility, there are many unknowns such as how often it was be useful/feasible to undergo this treatment, the expense and so on. Since it may have been useful in one case of Dupuytren's contracture, we should perhaps try to find out if this study has ever been followed up. I've drawn a blank so far.
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phatkatwun

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2009, 10:28:49 AM »

I am supposed to get this treatment for Radiation Proctitis in my rectum later this year. The Proctitis is a side effect of radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

Maybe I will get a side benefit and it will fix the Peyronies Disease as well ;D.
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newguy

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2009, 06:40:03 PM »

phat- hah :). I would be eager to see how the treatment affected those with current inflammation, as a sudden and significant reduction in pain would be a good way to tell that the treatment is working. From reading your past post, I assume that you are not in pain and there is a level of stability to your condition, so that could make it tricky to draw any conclusions from this. Still, please do let us know if any changes take place :).
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newguy

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Quote
It is believed that a chronic state of corporal oxygen desaturation or hypoxemia secondary to the loss of nocturnal erections is a fundamental pathophysiological cause of erectile dysfunction (Erectile Dysfunction). Limited invasive blood gas measurements in human models have shown decreased oxygen tension in vasculogenic impotence. Normative data on flaccid and erect oxygen saturation (StO2) levels are lacking due to the invasive nature of blood gas determinations. Our objective was to determine StO2 in the flaccid and erect penis in men with and without Erectile Dysfunction using a tissue oximeter. This FDA-approved instrument provides instantaneous, noninvasive, painless local tissue StO2 measurements, which highly correlate to blood gas data. The study population included 171 men (18–90 years) who presented to one andrologist. They completed the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) based on pharmacologically unassisted erectile function and had penile StO2 measurements taken. 64 of these men had repeat measurements after PGE-1 induced erections. There are significant differences (P < .001) in corporal and glanular StO2 in the flaccid (right corpora, 45.23%; left corpora, 52.50%) and erect state (right corpora, 76.58; left corpora, 80.42). Men with Erectile Dysfunction (right corpora, 45.04% vs 53.58%; P = .02; and left corpora, 50.95% vs 58.78%; P = .03) have significantly lower corporal penile StO2. Future prospective data collection can correlate penile StO2 in specific populations, such as diabetics and RRP patients. This may help further elucidate the relationship between corporal hypoxia and the development and progression of Erectile Dysfunction and possibly its treatment and prevention.
- http://www.andrologyjournal.org/cgi/content/full/28/2/223

(this could've been added the Erectile Dysfunction forum too, but as its related to this train of thought it's quite at home here i think). This study of course isn't linked specifically to peyronie's, but continues the conversation regarding whether oxygen therapy may be of use.
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Hawk

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2009, 11:04:34 PM »

I cannot imagine that oxygenation would not help but it seems that even in a hyperbaric chamber that you would almost have to induce at least a semi-erection to get the super-oxygenated blood into the penile tissue.

I too have had radiation for prostate cancer and have considered faking Radiation Proctitis just for the Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.  ;D
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TheSolution

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Been doing Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2009, 11:41:04 PM »

I did 6 sessions at 2 atm for 90 minutes. 24/7 Pain was reduced after 2 sessions. But I also starting doing hot tub therapy 3 times daily. So might be the hot tub.

But I felt like I was still actually injured and just wasn't healing. My problem might be unique. I am not getting flaccid at all. Staying in a mini hard state after injury that is painful and maybe keeping oxygen low. I have no idea why. Hot tub or alcohol makes it more flaccid, so I do both a lot. So Oxygen treatment might have benefitted me more than most. Its been 3 weeks now and I down to a 1-2 on pain scale from a 6-7. I think curve has went from 25 deg to 10 (maybe from hot tub). But this was recent curve starting in May, so hard to tell whats happening.

My new doctor thought it was okay to try. Was "hoping" it would cause new blood vessels to break through scars/calcium and help break up. Also because my latest injury is more recent, thought it would help heal. But was very clear to tell me to not expect miracles.

But pain going down like it did was a huge benefit to me and worth the cost. Price was $240 per session. Very pricey, but much cheaper than hospital price of $1500/session. But I would have paid anything to reduce pain.

Any Barametric place will know doctors who will prescribe it. Might have to push the doctor a little. I told him, "what's the harm".



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TheSolution

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If you do Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2009, 11:54:38 PM »

I am not sure about inducing an erection in chamber. I did it. I blow a small blood vessel. Had 2 cm dot of red blood (under skin on penis)after my first visit. Was very painful and still hurts. Might be me, that spot had hurt and was a problem for 10 yrs. It was a bad vein that was going to burst one day. Was a 1 mm purple dot that my urologist said was in my head. But I always had pain there and knew it was a bad spot in the vein.

I think the partial erection keep the pressure too high in my veins as I decompressed. Since I scuba and have no problems with my ears, they decompressed me very quickly (3 minutes), but I had an mini erection and that's when it blew.

So be careful. But I agree that in theory, getting an erection is beneficial. But even though I did blow that blood vessel, I feel so much better after this treatment that it was worth it.

Then again, maybe that vein was ready to bust and had nothing to do with erection. Was just the pressure.
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newguy

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2009, 10:42:34 PM »

TheSolution - It would be of interest to use this treatment on somebody very new to peyronie's but with pain. That way we'd be able to ge an idea of whether this type of treatment can interfer with pain and plaque formation.Do you think that your doctor would be interested in exploring this?
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phatkatwun

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2009, 07:24:16 PM »

I went to the GI doctor for the radiation proctitis and he went in with a sigmoid scope to cauterize the wound. The HBO was to be used only as a last resort in case the cauterizing did not work. So I won't be getting the HBO therapy. The bad news is, he found in its place a large cancer tumor. I had a recent (2008) colonoscopy which found nothing except the radiation burn. Kinda loses my faith in a colonoscopy.
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Tim468

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2009, 10:13:00 PM »

Dear Phatkatwun

Hang in there big guy. That sounds awful. MY thoughts and prayers are with you.

Tim
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newguy

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2009, 02:24:58 PM »

Very sorry to hear that. You are in my thoughts. Stay strong!
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cino

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hyperbaric chamber
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2011, 05:20:38 PM »

hallo, I'm writing from Italy (Europe). I am sick since 2005, I have tried all
the usual care. The disease has stabilized. I always thought that the
This could be in a hyperbaric chamber that would allow
improved peripheral circulation. my doctors do not agree.
What do you think about it?

[email protected]
[email protected]
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newguy

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Re: hyperbaric chamber
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2011, 06:29:20 PM »

These changes have been mentioned a time or two in the part, and it has always been a potential alternative therapy that I've thought held some interest. I'm not actually if many people have used it for a peyronie's specific treatment though. You'd need someone willing to do a study I'd imagine.
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George999

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Re: hyperbaric chamber
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2011, 09:49:12 PM »

I think the problem here is that IF this disease is about a globally faulty metabolic process, which I believe it it, then simply enhancing circulation is not going to do the trick.  In fact, I know of no research that even indicates that the process precipitating Peyronie's is associated with circulatory problems.  Certainly Peyronie's plaque would hinder circulation, but whatever causes the plaque in the first place is the problem, not a lack of circulation.  Simply restoring circulation impacted by Peyronie's is not going to fix the original problem which, in fact, initiated the scarring process.  - George
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boomerang

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment (HBOT)
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2012, 06:45:36 PM »

Just thought I would let you know about this one because I am undergoing treatment at the moment.
The centre I go to is a charity and was the first Hyperbaric Oxygen treatment centre in the World.
It has three chambers and can take something like 16 patients at a time.
My wife has MS so this is how I found out about it.
It was used originally to treat Multiple Sclerosis but has been found therapeutic for many conditions ranging from ME, Parkinson’s, Cancer, Ulcers, Lyme Disease, Football injuries, migraines and many more. There are a couple of NHS(National Health Service UK) patients using it at the moment.

I am trying this treatment to get rid of some annoying left over symptoms from my underlying condition.

I think I have mentioned previously that I have Hughes Syndrome.  This is where the blood is too sticky and thick.
It causes many symptoms because the blood circulates through every organ of the body.
If the viscosity is too high or the blood is sticky then the blood cannot easily pass through the capillaries and the cells are starved of oxygen, glucose and nutrients.

I can say that the hyperbaric oxygen is working.  Although the Neprinol that I take was removing most of the symptoms including all the chronic fatigue I was still suffering from sore legs when sitting for more than a few minutes. I also got a very cold right leg and belly when lying on my back which made sleeping a nightmare plus several other symptoms which were making my life a misery.

I am able to sit at a computer now for much longer and get some work done and I am able to exercise more without stiffness.

I do not know how this will affect my Peyronie's but I will let you know.

I suspect as in other diseases it has an initial stage where treatments will work but once it has reached a certain point it is very difficult to reverse the damage.  My Peyronie's was not diagnosed until it had run its course fully even though I had been visiting my doctor and a clinic when it was only just a sore lump near the end of my penis.
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james1947

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment (HBOT)
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2012, 08:27:00 PM »

Boomerang
Can you give a short explanation regarding
Quote
Hyperbaric Oxygen treatment
?
I have also thick blood.
James
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boomerang

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment (HBOT)
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2012, 07:11:24 PM »

This is my hypothesis so far from many hours of study as to the causes of thick blood and Peyronie’s and underlying conditions:

It is just a hypothesis and I am updating it all the time.

Thick blood can be caused by a variety of reasons, too many red blood cells, red blood cells that are too big, too many platelets, too much vitamin K, too much fibrinogen and fibrin caused by inflammation, lack of plasmin, immune reactions causing too many immune cells in the blood, too much thrombin, too little plasma, dehydration, bacteria and yeasts in the blood, food intolerances, leaky gut and many other reasons I am sure.

What I believe thick blood causes:
When the blood is thick it will have difficulty passing through the capillaries which are the smallest vessels which join the arteries to the veins. Oxygen, glucose and nutrient transfer to the cells of the body happens in the capillaries so impeded flow will result in cells which are sick and deprived of the vitals of life.  Not only that but the Alveoli in the lungs will have restricted blood flow.

Inflammation is the key to much of this I believe. 
Inflammation causes fibrinogen to be generated and turned into fibrin.  Thick blood will cause inflammation because the cells become sick and will leave them open to infection by anaerobic bacteria.
Anaerobic bacteria are always present in our bodies. 
Anything which restricts blood flow will encourage anaerobic bacteria to thrive. Anaerobic bacteria like to restrict blood flow.

So we have a vicious circle.   Which can start at any point.  Inflammation, infection, thick blood.

Thick blood leads to infection and inflammation.
Inflammation leads to infection and thick blood.
Infection leads to inflammation and thick blood.

So the cause may start as thick blood, infection or inflammation.

Hence with Peyronie's some people get it as a result of injury causing inflammation while others get it without injury but have underlying conditions which cause thick blood or inflammation or both.

Thick blood will cause injury to capillaries by damage to cells.

Anaerobic bacteria are opportunistic and do not like oxygen hence why blood thinners and HBOT (Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy) work to reduce inflammation by delivering oxygenated blood to these bacteria. 

Scar tissue and damage to body tissue will be more difficult to reverse.

I am looking at trying a much stronger dose of Serrapeptase which is supposed to dissolve scar tissue.

Hope this helps.

I may be wrong and am always open to constructive criticism.
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newguy

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment (HBOT)
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2012, 08:42:51 AM »

It always interests me when this topic comes up, so it's great that we might be able to get a take on its usefulness. I'd quite like a study to be done on those with very recently diagnosed peyronie's. We should leave no stone unturned in our quest to find viable treatments for peyronie;s.
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james1947

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment (HBOT)
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2012, 10:13:21 AM »

boomerang
I made some Googling and finally I understand what HBOT is.
Your theory is interesting, for me specially because I also have thick blood. I will follow up your posts to see progression.
I am taking now Pentox and I see my small blue veins on my face and feet's disappearing slowly, so the blood flow is better.
As I worked many years in aviation I know that some combat aircrafts are supplying 100% from zero altitude, some from 10,000 feet and up, most from 10,000 and up pressurised oxygen supply to force the pilot to brief. The oxygen pressure increases with the altitude.
It has some side effects also.
Premature baby's also are supplied with oxygen, it makes some future problems with vision, most will use glasses in early age.
James
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2012, 10:31:38 AM »

I would also add that in the US hyperbaric oxygen treatment is very commonly used to successfully stimulate repair of tissue damage caused by diabetes.  - George
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2012, 08:00:34 PM »

Any update on how the Hyperbaric chamber treatments and its effects on your peyronies?
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2012, 08:23:55 PM »

I too am interested in hearing any updates on this.
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2012, 08:02:09 PM »

no update?
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2013, 12:10:35 AM »

I read about a center near me that does hyperbaric oxygen therapy and have become interested in it, though I have a feeling the price will be prohibitive. Has anyone tried it and know a general price? I'm planning to call and ask a few questions when the offices open again after the weekend.
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2013, 12:45:56 AM »

There are many people that will sell desperate people anything! Hyperbaric oxygen has several uses... I do not think that Peyronies is one of them.
Yes is dose heal diabetic wound, osteonecrosis of the jaw. It good for carbon monoxide poisoning. It is used with some severe infections!
It is true HBOT is oxygen under pressure.  They call it diving, because you are put 2-3 fathoms below sea level. Oxygen under pressure saturates the tissue with oxygen right down into the bones. It has its risks, ear drum rupture,increase metabolism (it lowers blood sugars in diabetic patients).
 Increased altitude like Denver the partial pressure of oxygen is less which is why they give it in high altitudes. The cost for the therapy varies, you have to have a approved diagnoses for insurance to pay for it. There will always be some place that will let you pay out of pocket, with no promise of a cure.
 Remember the old adage...if it sounds to good to be true...
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2013, 07:34:50 AM »

DO:

HBOT chambers are also used by the marine world when a diver has to come to the surface faster than their normal ascent. This usually occurs during an emergency ascent for the sake of saving the life of the diver i.e. their oxygen source is suddenly depleted or cut off for some reason.

Old Man
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2013, 10:34:35 AM »

Has anyone tried it and know a general price?

I've not tried it, but the number I have heard is from $200 to $300 per session.  - George
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2013, 07:29:49 AM »

I suppose we will never get an update from Boomerang regarding his success/failure with "Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy"
Maybe he had 100% success or maybe 100% failure, in both cases he will not update the forum :(
He was last active at June 28, 2012, 12:06:30 AM
Maybe someone else will spend money (I hope his insurance) to know if it helps or not for Peyronies ;D

James
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2013, 09:55:30 AM »

Well, my call got redirected to about five different offices (large hospital system) and no one seemed to know where hyperbaric oxygen therapy was done, but finally I ended up at the Chronic Wound Care Clinic, which I think is where it is located. No one was there though, so I left a message and hopefully will hear back from them.

EDIT: Oooook.... I got a call back from someone that I don't think was at that wound clinic, so maybe it is located somewhere else. I got quoted around $2,000 a treatment, of which the lady did not know how much insurance would reimburse (I specifically mentioned I don't have insurance beforehand). She said HBOT is always a series of treatments and never just one, and some people need up to 10, 20, or 40 treatments. On top of that, there are 14 recognized medical diagnoses that are allowed to be treated with HBOT, and they are not able to treat anything else. My Lyme disease and related wound healing troubles do not make the cut. I asked what a few examples of the allowable 14 are and she mentioned radiation, skin grafts, osteomyelitis, "body parts being reattached"... so at the moment this is not an option.
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DO

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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #29 on: January 15, 2013, 01:57:23 PM »

hyperbaric oxygen therapy has two types of chambers.... a single one person and multi chamber several people in one room like setting! They last about 90 minutes each session, They say results can be measured from 5 consecutive days (none on the weekends) for 30-60- 90 days in a row. But peyronies is not on the list that is covered. I used to run a center, but cash paid up front can get you the discount. You have to talk to the right people!
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Re: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2013, 10:48:26 AM »

I have heard that some of the larger physical therapy centers offer these treatments.  Also there are a number of stand alone clinics that offer them.  These clinics are offered by innovative doctors who WILL treat any malady that they think might respond to treatment and they won't impose an arbitrary number of treatments at the onset.  Just one example: http://www.whitakerwellness.com/therapies/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy/  - George
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